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Title          
Why Some Women Share Lots of Photos on Facebo... 
   
 
Abstract

Ref : http://www.buffalo.edu/news/12339

In a new study published in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, University at Buffalo researcher Michael A. Stefanone, PhD, and colleagues found that females who base their self worth on their appearance tend to share more photos online and maintain larger networks on online social networking sites. He says the results suggest that females identify more strongly with their image and appearance, and use Facebook as a platform to compete for attention. The study, "Contingencies of Self-Worth and Social-Networking-Site Behavior," was co-authored by Derek Lackaff, PhD, University of Texas, Austin, and  

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Added By - A Ghosh
Subject - Communications
Document Type - Journal Paper Discussion
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Inhibitors of leucine-rich repeat kinase-2 pr... 
   
 
Abstract
Leucine-rich repeat kinase-2 (LRRK2) mutations are a common cause of Parkinson's disease. In this paper, Byoung Dae Lee1, Joo-Ho Shin1, Jackalina VanKampen, Leonard Petrucelli, Andrew B West1, Han Seok Ko1, Yun-Il Lee1, Kathleen A Maguire-Zeiss, William J Bowers, Howard J Federoff, Valina L Dawson1 & Ted M Dawson have identified inhibitors of LRRK2 kinase that are protective in in vitro and in vivo models of LRRK2-induced neurodegeneration. The results establish that LRRK2-induced degeneration of neurons in vivo is kinase dependent and that LRRK2 kinase inhibition provides a potential new neuroprotective paradigm for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.
 
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Added By - autocrawler
Subject - Medical Sciences
Document Type - Journal Paper Discussion
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Post-copulatory sexual selection and sexual c... 
   
 
Abstract
Male pregnancy in seahorses, pipefishes and sea dragons (family Syngnathidae) represents a striking reproductive adaptation that has shaped the evolution of behaviour and morphology in this group of fishes1. In many syngnathid species, males brood their offspring in a specialized pouch, which presumably evolved to facilitate male parental care5, 6. However, an unexplored possibility is that brood pouch evolution was partly shaped by parent–offspring or sexual conflict, processes that would result in trade-offs between current and future pregnancies. Here we report a controlled breeding experiment using the sexually dimorphic Gulf pipefish, Syngnathus scovelli, to test for post-copulatory sexual selection within broods and for trade-offs between successive male pregnancies as functions of female attractiveness. Offspring survivorship within a pregnancy was affected by the size of a male’s mate, the number of eggs transferred and the male’s sexual responsiveness. Significantly, we also found that embryo survivorship in a current pregnancy was negatively related to survivorship in the prior pregnancy, clearly demonstrating fitness trade-offs between broods. Overall, our data indicate that post-copulatory sexual selection and sexual c...
 
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Added By - autocrawler
Subject - Biology
Document Type - Journal Paper Discussion
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Leaping shampoo and the stable Kaye effect  
   
 
Abstract
DOI - 10.1088/1742-5468/2006/07/P07007 Shear-thinning fluids exhibit surprisingly rich behavior. One example is the Kaye effect which occurs when a thin stream of a solution of polyisobutylene in decalin is poured into a dish of the fluid. As pouring proceeds, a small stream of liquid occasionally leaps upward from the heap. This surprising effect, which lasts only a second or so, is named after its first observer, Kaye, who could offer no explanation for this behaviour. Later, Collyer and Fischer suggested from 250 frames s−1 cine recordings that the fluid must be highly shear thinning as well as elastic and 'pituitous' (slimy or sticky). In addition, their results suggested that a rigid surface is required to back the reflected liquid stream. While the words bouncing and reflection are associated with elastic effects, we will show here that the Kaye effect is in fact a continuous flow phenomenon. We show that the Kaye effect works for many common fluids, including shampoos and liquid soaps. We reveal its physical mechanism (formation, stability and disruption) through high-speed imaging. The measurements are interpreted with a simple theoretical model including only the shear thinning behaviour of the liquid; elastic p...
 
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Added By - autocrawler
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type - Journal Paper Discussion
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Whales originated from aquatic artiodactyls i... 
   
 
Abstract

In this video, Hans Thewissen and Lisa Cooper from the Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine discuss their paper entitled "Whales originated from aquatic artiodactyls in the Eocene epoch of India", published in the Nature (Vol 450 Issue 7173 20 December 2007). Their co-authors include Mark Clementz, Sunil Bajpai and B.N.Tiwari.

Although the first ten million years of whale evolution are documented by a remarkable series of fossil skeletons, the link to the ancestor of cetaceans has been missing. It was known that whales are related to even-toed ungulates (artiodactyls), but until now no artiodactyls were mo...

 
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Added By - autocrawler
Subject - Biology
Document Type - Journal Paper Discussion
Video Duration - moderate
 
 
 

 

Title          
Influence of a Streamwise Pressure Gradient o... 
   
 
Abstract

In this video, Kiran Dellimore gives a broad overview of his research paper entitled  'Influence of a Streamwise Pressure Gradient on Film-Cooling Effectiveness' published in the JOURNAL OF THERMOPHYSICS AND HEAT TRANSFER,Vol. 23, No. 1, January-March 2009. His co-authors are Carlos Cruz, Andre W. Marshall, and Christopher P. Cadou all from the University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742.

The paper may be accessed using the following DOI: 10.2514/1.35717

Film cooling is widely used in conventional gas turbine and rocket engines to minimize thermal loading of engine structures and to manage heat transfer between hot, reacting gases and cooler structural components. Previous experimental work has shown that streamwise pressure gradients strongly influence the performance of the film.This paper extends semi-empirical modeling ideas for wall-jet film cooling to include the effects of adverse and favorable pressure gradients. The extended model shows that a pressure gradient’s effect on cooling performance depends on whether the velocity of the film is greater than the core flow (a wall-jet...

 
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Added By - kdellimo
Subject - Aeronautics and Astronautics
Document Type - Journal Paper Discussion
Video Duration - 00:05:20
 
 
 

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