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Title          
Seth Lloyd's Quantum Computer 
   
 
Abstract
Professor Seth Lloyd talks about the world's smallest universe, quantum mechanics, quantum computers, and pushing Moore's Law beyond the capacity of the human brain. A quantum computer is any device for computation that makes direct use of distinctively quantum mechanical phenomena, such as superposition and entanglement, to perform operations on data. In a classical (or conventional) computer, information is stored as bits; in a quantum computer, it is stored as qubits (quantum bits). The basic principle of quantum computation is that the quantum properties can be used to represent and structure data, and that quantum mechanisms can be devised and built to perform operations with this data. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_computer
 
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Added By - matlabuser
Subject - Computer Science
Document Type - Profile
Video Duration - 00:03:59
 
 
 

 

Title          
Kettering University - Business and Managemen... 
   
 
Abstract
Kettering Students have produced the following video about academic life at Kettering University.

Concentrations in Business include:
* Accounting/Finance
* Information Systems
* Manufacturing Management
* General Business
* Marketing

For more information about Kettering's academic programs please visit http://www.kettering.edu/futurestudents
 
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Added By - 123
Subject - Business and Management
Document Type - Profile
Video Duration - 00:00:02
 
 
 

 

Title          
Kettering University - Mechanical Engineering 
   
 
Abstract
Kettering Students have produced the following video about academic life at Kettering University.

Six Mechanical Engineering (ME) specialities are available: * Automotive - Body & Chassis, * Automotive - Powertrain, * Bioengineering, * Machine Design - Design for Durability, * Machine Design - Mechanical System Design, or * Plastics Product Design.

You may also minor in Fuel Cells & Hybrids

For more information about Kettering's academic programs please visit http://www.kettering.edu/futurestudents
 
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Added By - 123
Subject - Mechanical Engineering
Document Type - Profile
Video Duration - 00:00:02
 
 
 

 

Title          
Kettering University - Electrical and Compute... 
   
 
Abstract
Kettering Students have produced the following video about academic life at Kettering University.

For more information about Kettering's academic programs please visit http://www.kettering.edu/futurestudents/
 
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Added By - 123
Subject - Electrical Engineering
Document Type - Profile
Video Duration - 00:00:02
 
 
 

 

Title          
Boeing 747-400 
   
 
Abstract
The Boeing 747-400 is the latest version of the Boeing 747 in service. The -400 series is the best selling and the most advanced model of the 747 family. The 747-400 is being replaced by the Boeing 747-8, expected to enter service in 2009.

The 747-400 was announced by Boeing Commercial Airplanes in October 1985. Compared to the 747-300 the 747-400 has 6 ft (1.83 m) wing tip extensions and 6 ft (2 m) winglets, an all-new glass cockpit which dispensed with the need for a flight engineer, tail fuel tanks, revised engines, an all-new interior, revised fuselage/wing fairings and newer in-flight entertainment to the basic design of the -300 series. Like the 747-300, the passenger version of the 747-400 included the stretched upper deck (SUD) as a standard feature. The SUD was almost twice as long as the standard upper deck. It had previously been offered as a retrofit and first appeared on two Japanese 747-100 SR models.[1] While the wingspan was increased, the overall weight of the wings was decreased due to the use of composites and aluminum alloys.

It was rolled out in January 1988 and first flew on April 29, 1988. Certification was received on January 10, 1989 with PW4000 engines, May 18, 1989 with CF6-...
 
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Added By - prashant bharadwaj
Subject - Aeronautics and Astronautics
Document Type - Profile
Video Duration - 00:00:02
 
 
 

 

Title          
The Triumph and Tragedy of a Genius: Robert O... 
   
 
Abstract
Oppenheimer NHD Documentary

The Manhattan Project was the project to develop the first nuclear weapon (atomic bomb) during World War II by the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada. Formally designated as the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), it refers specifically to the period of the project from 1941–1946 under the control of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, under the administration of General Leslie R. Groves. The scientific research was directed by American physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer.

The project succeeded in developing and detonating three nuclear weapons in 1945: a test detonation of a plutonium implosion bomb on July 16 (the Trinity test) near Alamogordo, New Mexico; an enriched uranium bomb code-named "Little Boy" on August 6 over Hiroshima, Japan; and a second plutonium bomb, code-named "Fat Man" on August 9 over Nagasaki, Japan.

The project's roots lay in scientists' fears since the 1930s that Nazi Germany was also investigating nuclear weapons of its own. Born out of a small research program in 1939, the Manhattan Project eventually employed more than 130,000 people and cost nearly $2 billion USD ($23 billion in 2007 dollars based on CPI). It re...
 
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Added By - 123456
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Profile
Video Duration - 00:00:02
 
 
 

 

Title          
Oppenheimer 
   
 
Abstract
J. Robert Oppenheimer[1] (April 22, 1904 – February 18, 1967) was an American theoretical physicist, best known for his role as the director of the Manhattan Project, the World War II effort to develop the first nuclear weapons, at the secret Los Alamos laboratory in New Mexico. Known as "the father of the atomic bomb," Oppenheimer was shocked by the weapon's killing power after it was used to destroy the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Quoting from the Bhagavad Gita, he said "If the radiance of a thousand suns were to burst at once into the sky, that would be like the splendor of the mighty one. Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds."

After the war, Oppenheimer was a chief advisor to the newly created United States Atomic Energy Commission and used that position to lobby for international control of atomic energy and to avert the nuclear arms race with the Soviet Union. After invoking the ire of many politicians and scientists with his outspoken political opinions during the Red Scare, he had his security clearance revoked in a much-publicized and politicized hearing in 1954. Though stripped of his direct political influence, Oppenheimer continued to lecture, write, and w...
 
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Added By - 123456
Subject - Physics
Document Type - Profile
Video Duration - 00:00:02
 
 
 

 

Title          
3.5 miles in 10 seconds 
   
 
Abstract
Born in Berkeley, California, Crossfield grew up in California and Washington. He served with the U.S. Navy as a flight instructor and fighter pilot during World War II. From 1946-1950, he worked in the University of Washington's Kirsten Wind Tunnel while earning his bachelor's(1949) and master's degrees(1950) in aeronautical engineering. In 1950, he joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' High-Speed Flight Station (now the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center) at Edwards Air Force Base, California, as an aeronautical research pilot. In those early days, it was called Muroc Field, reverse spelling of the wealthy California Corum family who donated the land to the Army Air Corps. Crossfield joined the Navy because he could enter flight training two weeks earlier than a date offered by the Army Air Corps.

Crossfield demonstrated his flight test skills on his very first student solo. His instructor was not available on the designated early morning, so Crossfield, on his own, took off and went through maneuvers he had practiced with his instructor, to include spin entry and spin recovery. During the first spin, Crossfield experienced vibrations, banging, and noise in the aircraft that he had never encountere...
 
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Added By - 123456
Subject - Aeronautics and Astronautics
Document Type - Profile
Video Duration - 00:00:02
 
 
 

 

Title          
Terence Tao 
   
 
Abstract

He received the Salem Prize in 2000, the Bôcher Prize in 2002, and the Clay Research Award in 2003, for his contributions to analysis including work on the Kakeya conjecture and wave maps. In 2005 he received the American Mathematical Society's Levi L. Conant Prize with Allen Knutson, and in 2006 he was awarded the SASTRA Ramanujan Prize.

In 2004, Ben Green and Tao released a preprint proving what is now known as the Green-Tao theorem. This theorem states that there are arbitrarily long arithmetic progressions of prime numbers. The New York Times described it this way:[9][10]

“ In 2004, Dr. Tao, along with Ben Green, a mathematician now at the University of Cambridge in England, solved a problem related to the Twin Prime Conjecture by looking at prime number progressions — series of numbers equally spaced. (For example, 3, 7 and 11 constitute a progression of prime numbers with a spacing of 4; the next number in the sequence, 15, is not prime.) Dr. Tao and Dr. Green proved that it is always possible to find, somewhere in the infinity of integers, a progression of prime numbers of equal spacing and any length. ”

For this and other work, he was awarded the ...

 
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Added By - 123456
Subject - Mathematics
Document Type - Profile
Video Duration - 00:00:02
 
 
 

 

Title          
Terry Tao Fields Medal In Math 
   
 
Abstract

Terence Chi-Shen Tao (陶哲軒) (born 17 July 1975, Adelaide, South Australia) is an Australian mathematician working primarily on harmonic analysis, partial differential equations, combinatorics, analytic number theory and representation theory.

A child prodigy, Tao is currently a professor of mathematics at UCLA. He was promoted to a full professor at age 24. In August 2006, he was awarded the Fields Medal. Just one month later, in September 2006, he was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society on 18 May 2007.

Tao exhibited extraordinary mathematical abilities from an early age, attending university level mathematics courses at the age of nine. He is one of only two children in the history of the Johns Hopkins' Study of Exceptional Talent program to have achieved a score of 700 or greater on the SAT math section while just 8 years old (he scored a 760). In 1986, 1987, and 1988, Tao was the youngest participant to date in the International Mathematical Olympiad, first competing at the age of ten, winning a bronze, silver, and gold medal respectively. He won the gold medal when he just turned thirteen and remains the youngest gold medallis...

 
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Added By - 123456
Subject - Mathematics
Document Type - Profile
Video Duration - 00:00:02
 
 
 

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